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Tuesday, June 11, 2013

Rain garden at work

This is what my front yard looked like after a heavy rain.

This is what it looked like yesterday with our rain garden after the heavy rain downpours.

You can see how the excess rainwater runoff flowed from one section of the garden to another section.  But none went into the storm drains.

P.S.
     One of the impacts of heavy rain is on the root systems of trees.  This is particularly a problem in areas the heavy runoff like above.  Below is one of the trees in my neighborhood impacted by the heavy rain.


Signs of problems with tree root weakness is below:

Tree damage from flooding can lead to a decline in health or death
·         Flooding can drown a tree’s roots and the root cells die due to the lack of oxygen
·         Organic matter decomposition releases carbon dioxide, methane, hydrogen sulfide and other harmful gases
·         Foliage submerged for prolonged periods will have a difficult time recovering
·         Floating debris can cause damage to the tree and bark
·         Excessive water removes soil from root zones and leads to an instable trunk

5 things Homeowners should look out for:
·         Structural damage
·         Premature fall color
·         Wilted leaves, discolored foliage and die-back are all caused by flooding
·         The emergence of pest infestations
·         Exposed roots or unstable trunk
Solution:
·         Corrective pruning of dead/broken branches
·         Re-setting or staking trees that are unstable or leaning
·         Flush sediments and leach the soil
·         Pest management as needed
·         Add mulching to protect new sensitive roots and improve aeration
·         Management of mineral nutrition with micro-nutrients and slow-release nitrogen sources
·         Where salt water has intruded, the soil may need to be leached to remove the sodium
·         Sediment deposits should be removed to return soil level to original grade
·         Trees that are kept in a healthy condition will be better able to withstand massive flooding

P.S.
    If you would like to participate in the Columbia Association Rain Garden grant program go to this link.

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